Hologram FAQ’s

Q: How was the hologram invented ?

A: Holography dates from 1947, when British (native of Hungary) scientist Dennis Gabor developed the theory of holography while working to improve the resolution of an electron microscope.Gabor coined the term hologram from the Greek words holos, meaning “whole,” and gramma, meaning “message”.

 

Q: What does a hologram do ?

A: A hologram is a physical structure that diffracts light into an image. The term ‘hologram’ can refer to both the encoded material and the resulting image. A holographic image can be seen by looking into an illuminated holographic print or by shining a laser through a hologram and projecting the image onto a screen.

 

Q: How does a hologram work ?

A: When a laser beam is split up to make a hologram, the light waves in the two parts of the beam are traveling in identical ways. … This information is burned permanently into the photographic plate by the laser beams. So a hologram is effectively a permanent record of what something looks like seen from any angle.

 

Q: How does a holographic sight work?

A: A holographic weapon sight or holographic diffraction sight is a non-magnifying gun sight that allows the user to look through a glass optical window and see a reticle image superimposed at a distance on the field of view. The hologram of the reticle is built into the window and is illuminated by a laser diode.

 

Q: What is the difference between a hologram and a holograph?

A: Holography is a method of producing a three-dimensional (3-D) image of an object. (The three dimensions are height, width, and depth.) … The hologram is actually a recording of the difference between two beams of coherent light. Light is composed of waves that are all the same length and that travel in all directions.